Chat with us, powered by LiveChat LiveChat

College of Nursing & Health Sciences

Bachelor of Science in Information Technology

NOTE: The Bachelor of Science in Information Technology program is currently not approved to participate in any Title IV (federal student financial aid) programs. Students may seek other payment options (Monthly Payment Plans, Cash, scholarships, etc.)

The Bachelor of Science in Information Technology (BSIT) provides students the opportunity to complete an undergraduate degree while continuing to work full time. The curriculum introduces students to the information technologies needed in businesses, government, healthcare, schools, and other kinds of organizations.

The curriculum facilitates learning by combining theoretical knowledge and practical hands-on expertise, to help students develop core competencies in technology infrastructure, including hardware, software, operating systems, applications, data storage and analytics, communication systems and information security.  Students have the opportunity to both learn, plan and manage the entire technology lifecycle.

All students in the Bachelor of Science in Information Technology program are required to complete common requirements in general education courses, Information Technology core courses (including capstone course), and one of the following concentrations:

  • Cyber Security
  • Systems Administration
  • Computer Networks
  • Business Analytics
  • Software Development
  • Web Design
  • Robotics and Artificial Intelligence
  • General Management

 

Program Learning Outcomes

  1. Analyze a complex computing problem and apply principles of computing and other relevant disciplines to identify solutions.
  2. Address cultural or digital divide issues in designing or implementing IT solutions.
  3. Design, implement, and evaluate a computing-based solution to meet a given set of computing requirements in the context of the IT discipline.
  4. Write and illustrate effectively in a variety of professional contexts.
  5. Speak and present effectively in a variety of professional contexts.
  6. Function effectively as a member or leader of a team engaged in activities appropriate to the IT discipline.
  7. Apply quantitative problem-solving skills to manage IT projects.
  8. Recognize professional responsibilities and make informed judgments in computing practice based on legal and ethical principles.
  9. Identify and analyze user needs and take them into account in the selection, creation, integration, evaluation, and administration of computing-based systems.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

Individuals wishing to enroll in the Bachelor of Science in Information Technology degree must apply and be admitted to the University. All admission materials must be submitted directly to the admissions office (with exception of transcripts) by the application deadline (if applicable). An application to USU includes, but is not limited to, the following:

  • Complete and submit an application for admission,
  • Interview with an Enrollment Advisor,
  • Submit documentation of high school graduation or equivalent as defined under the U.S. Department of Education regulation,
    • Foreign high school diplomas or their equivalent must be evaluated and translated, if applicable, by an acceptable agency.
      • A member of the National Association of Credential Evaluation Services (NACES)
      • A member of the Association of International Credential Evaluators, Inc. (AICE)
    • Homeschooled students may apply for admission. The student should provide proof that he or she has completed their State’s requirements for high school graduation. The home school students’ parent(s) and/or guardian(s) are responsible for compliance with all State requirements.
  • Undergraduate applicants must submit their official transcripts from previously attended institutions. Foreign transcripts must be evaluated and translated, if applicable, by an acceptable evaluating agency:
    • A member of the National Association of Credential Evaluation Services (NACES)
    • A member of the Association of International Credential Evaluators, Inc. (AICE)
    • Nursing applicants may use the Commission on Graduates of Foreign Nursing Schools (CGFNS)
  • Complete an Enrollment Agreement.
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

All students in the Bachelor of Science in Information Technology program are required to complete common requirements in general education courses, management core courses (including a capstone course) and one of the following concentrations:

  • Cyber Security
  • Systems Administration
  • Computer Networks
  • Business Analytics
  • Software Development
  • Web Design
  • Robotics and Artificial Intelligence
  • General Management
TUITION & COST

Per Credit Hour:  $150 (General Education and Electives Courses) and $250 (Core and Concentration Courses)
Per Academic Year:  $4,800
Estimated Tuition:  $26,400

COMPLETION TIME

10 Semesters/40 months*

* Dependent on course load (i.e., Full-Time, Part-Time)

Core Requirements
45
Electives
15
Concentration Requirements
15

Core Requirements

BIS 101: Introduction to Business Information Systems

This course introduces undergraduate business students to information systems (IS). The course includes important topics related to IS, such as the drivers of IS, database concepts, IS development, and the types of systems used in organizations.

3 Credits

CCS 101: Programming Fundamentals

The course introduces students to structured programming techniques. Topics include different control statements (decision structures, loops, sequence, selection), functions, fundamental data types, and data structures (arrays and pointers). Upon successful completion of the course, students will apply principles of algorithm formulation and implementation, solve computer problems by using structured programming techniques and adequate tools (compiler, debugger and/or integrated development environment).

3 Credits

CIS 101: IT Fundamentals

This course provides foundational skills for subsequent IT courses. It provides an overview of the discipline of IT, describes how it relates to other computing disciplines, and begins to instill an IT mindset. The goal is to help students understand the diverse contexts in which IT is used and the challenges inherent in the diffusion of innovative technology.

3 Credits

CIS 105: Computer Hardware and Systems Administration I

This two-part course series is designed to prepare students to pass the TestOut PC Pro and the optional CompTIA A+ certifications for exams 220-901 and 220-902. These certifications measure not just what students know, but what students can do. It measures student abilities to install, manage, repair, and troubleshoot PC hardware and Windows, Linux, and Mac operating systems.

3 Credits

CIS 110: Fundamentals of Web Systems

This course covers the fundamentals of Web-Based Information Technology. Web-based technologies include distributed architecture, networking, database concepts, client and server development, infrastructure management, and web system integration.

3 Credits

CIS 200: Information Assurance and Security

This course focuses on the foundations of information assurance and security from a business perspective. The course includes important topics related to information assurance and security, such as fundamentals of information assurance and information security, developing security policies, ethics, legal issues, risk management, disaster recovery, human factors, compliance with regulations, and vulnerability issues.

3 Credits

CIS 205: Computer Hardware and Systems Administration II

This two-part course series is designed to prepare students to pass the TestOut PC Pro and the optional CompTIA A+ certifications for exams 220-901 and 220-902. These certifications measure not just what students know, but what students can do. In addition to covering everything a student needs to know in order to become certified, this course has been designed to help students gain real-world skills that you will use every day as a PC technician. Prerequisites: CIS105

3 Credits

CIS 310: IT Infrastructure

This course covers the IT governance framework and roadmap for planning and implementing a successful IT infrastructure. Key topics covered are: executive view of IT infrastructure, overview of Industry Best Practice Standards, Model and Guidelines covering some aspect of IT governance, principles of Business/IT Alignment Excellence, critical success factors and some select case studies. Prerequisites: CIS205

3 Credits

CIS 320: Database Systems

This course focuses on database principles and applications, covering topics such as: database theory and architecture; data modeling; designing application databases; query languages; data security; and database applications on the Web.

3 Credits

CIS 330: Wireless/Mobile Computing

This course reviews mobile and wireless networks. Key mobile networks topics covered are: basic architecture, mobile communications and mobile internet, mobile IP, and security and performance issues related to mobile computing. Key wireless networks topics covered are: wireless standards and protocols, wireless LANs and cellular networks, and security and performance issues related to wireless networks. Prerequisites: CNT100

3 Credits

CIS 340: Human Factors/Collaborative Computing

This course focuses on the human-computer interaction. The key topics covered are: user experience design techniques and best practices including requirements analysis, usability studies, prototyping methods, evaluation techniques, and cognitive, social, and emotional theories. Prerequisites: MAT245

3 Credits

CIS 499: Capstone

This course gives students a chance to apply their skills and knowledge obtained in previous computer hardware and systems administration, computer networking, information assurance and security, and programming classes to solve a challenging problem. Students will design, test, and manage an end-to-end converging and unified information and communication IT project, using a range of practices and techniques in solving a substantial problem.

3 Credits

CNT 100: Fundamentals of Networking

Practical course intended for those interested in learning computer networking with an emphasis on earning the Computing Technology Industry Association’s certification Network+, a foundation-level, vendor-neutral international industry credential that validates the knowledge of networking professionals.

3 Credits

MAT 241 Introduction to Probability and Statistics

Basic concepts of probability and statistics. Includes sets and probability, random variables and probability distribution, sampling, estimation theories, tests of hypotheses. Prerequisite: College Algebra or an equivalent math course

MAT 245 Discrete Mathematics

This course covers mathematical structures, including discrete structures. Key concepts covered are: sets, functions and relations, proof techniques, logic, boolean algebra principles, minimization, graphs and trees, combinatorics, iteration and recursion, complexity analysis, and discrete information technology applications. Prerequisites: College Algebra or an equivalent math course.

3 Credits

Electives

BUI 441 Survey of Accounting Analytics

Although businesses are accustomed to using the standard financial statements (e.g., balance sheet, profit and loss statement, budget, accounts receivable and revenue and expenses) to report on financial activities, businesses seek additional targeted, timely, and actionable data. In this course, students will study tools and techniques that can be applied to accounting data to provide information for managing risk, improving business processes and efficiency, reducing operating costs, and optimizing the business.

3 Credits

BUI 442 Using Analytics to Improve Business Processes

Businesses must understand how their policies, processes and operations affect the organization’s performance. This course examines how businesses can use data to align supply and demand and to evaluate alternative courses of action. The course examines the tools and techniques available to collect, manage, and analyze data to achieve a clearer understanding of a company’s operations and processes.

3 Credits

BUS 110 Data Analysis and Communication Tools

This course is a basic introduction to data analysis and communication tools. It is intended to expand students’ skills and competencies in using software tools for analyzing data, converting data into information, and creating and delivering presentations to support decision-making.

3 Credits

CCS 280 Data Structures

This course provides the students with understanding of the concepts of data structures used in development of computer applications. The key topics covered include: abstraction and encapsulation through abstract data types, linked lists, stacks, queues, trees, and graphs; knowledge of basic algorithmic analysis; various sorting and searching algorithms.

3 Credits

CCS 285 Cloud Foundations and Emerging Technology

This course focuses on perspectives, impact, concepts and fundamentals of cloud computing. Key topics include: security and data considerations, cloud computing applications, architecture, knowledge of development in the cloud, and cloud infrastructure and data.  Also, reviews strategies for emerging technologies, including current emerging technologies and conceptual emerging technologies.

3 Credits

CCS 331 Software Development Ethics

This course discusses current and past IT ethics issues, including ethical theories used to analyze problems encountered by computer professionals in today’s environment. Key topics covered are: social networking, government surveillance, and intellectual property, which ultimately prepares them to become responsible, ethical users of current and future information technologies.

3 Credits

CIS 312 IT Implementation and Evaluation

This course is an opportunity for students to design and integrate project proposal and feasibility studies.  The key topics introduced are: principles of project management, teamwork principles, supplier interactions, identifying and using professional technical literature, oral and written presentations.

3 Credits

HDA 310 Health Informatics

This course provides a multi-disciplinary approach to health informatics. The course explores the informatics in healthcare delivery and focuses on the clinical applications. The focus is on information technology including hardware, software, systems, and conceptual models of information. Different data types and data models are explored across various functional aspects of healthcare disciplines.

3 Credits

MAT 252 Pre-Calculus for Engineers

Pre-calculus concepts, including key concepts of trigonometry; conic sections; vectors, matrices complex numbers, probability and combinatorics and series. Prerequisites: College Algebra or equivalent

3 Credits

MGT 326 Operations Management

Operations are the engines of productivity and profitability of global firms. They produce outputs that satisfy customers, provide employment for employees, and produce returns for shareholders. Enterprises attempt to implement strategy and attain competitive advantage via the strength of their operations. They do so within a complex world of regulations, changing consumer demographics and expectations, and sustainability concerns. Fierce worldwide competition exists in the global environment for both customers and resources. Businesses must therefore strategically manage and optimize their operations to meet the demand of a complex marketplace. In this course, students learn about the stages of business operations, opportunities for improving processes, and the tools and techniques that are available to analyze operations.

3 Credits

MGT 332 Introduction to Project Management

This course introduces students to best practices in project management. Topics include definitions of project management and the environment. Students will also write proposals that cover the essential elements: project scope, work breakdown structure (WBS), the project schedule, project budget, and risk management, and project budgets. Group collaboration is emphasized to assist in understanding the effects of team/group dynamics in project management.

3 Credits

MGT 334 Organizational and Business Communication

This course provides an introduction to the mechanics and politics of organizational and business communication. Contemporary theories and the evolving rules of business and how we communicate in the era of social media are explored. Preparing and delivering reports, messages, and presentations is reviewed with learners having an opportunity to develop documents and messages.  Students will practice applying modern organizational communication strategies to internal and external business communication challenges from the lens of leadership with key constituents in mind.

3 Credits

Concentration in Business Analytics

BUA 440 Applied Databases: Structured Query Language (SQL)

Organizations require quality data that are readily available, in a standard format, and reliably accessible to permit analysis and reporting.  Relational databases are one of the major repositories for data, and the Structured Query Language (SQL) is used to access, manipulate and manage that data. Students are taught to use SQL to store, retrieve, manipulate, and analyze data.

3 Credits

BUA 441 Applied Analytic Tools

Modern, data-driven organizations frequently require complex reporting of their processes and outcomes.  This course covers advanced techniques, using popular analytic tools, to produce precise, unambiguous, clear analyses, including reports and visualizations.

3 Credits

BUA 442 Analytic Tools: Advanced Methods

The modern, data-driven enterprise requires complex analyses that exceed the capabilities of commercial desktop tools, like spreadsheets.  This course introduces students to the best practices in using popular programming languages and environments that are more suitable to complex analyses.  Additionally, students apply frameworks to create analyses that align with business needs, develop quality data, and include clear documentation for understanding and reproducing the analyses.

3 Credits

BUA 443 Database Management Tools I

Data obtained within organizational departments and across the enterprise must be stored and organized in a structured environment that enables reliable access, analysis, and reporting. Students will learn the fundamentals of a modern database management tools used to access, analyze, report and modify data.

3 Credits

BUA 444 Database Management Tools II

Increased regulatory and accrediting compliance, as well as a more competitive marketplace with demands for concomitant cost-control and improved outcomes, require robust methods of accessing, analyzing, and reporting.  In this course, students examine the use of dedicated reporting applications as tools to produce sophisticated reports and data displays. Prerequisites:  Database Management Tools I

3 Credits

Concentration in Cyber Security

CIS 331 Computer Security Threats, Attacks, and Vulnerabilities

This course covers the concepts and principles of information security threats, attacks, and vulnerabilities. The course includes important topics related to indicators of compromise, types of malware, types of attacks, types of vulnerabilities; types of threat actor and attributes; penetration testing; vulnerability scanning and the impact associated with vulnerabilities. This course directly maps to the objectives and outcomes of the official CompTIA Security+ certification exam. This course is also designed based on DHS/NSA’s Center of Academic Excellence criteria and Knowledge Units (KUs), as indicated in parentheses after each course learning outcome (CLO). Prerequisites: CIS 200

3 Credits

CIS 332 Advance Security Technologies and Tools

This course prepares students to properly use and deploy information security Technologies and Tools. The course includes important topics related to installing and configuring network components, both hardware and software-based, as well as assessing software tools used in an organization to assess the security posture of that organization. This course directly maps to the objectives and outcomes of the official CompTIA Security+ certification exam, and is also designed based on DHS/NSA’s Center of Academic Excellence criteria and Knowledge Units (KUs) guidelines, as indicated in parentheses after each course learning outcome (CLO). Prerequisites: CIS200

3 Credits

CIS 333 Security Architecture and Design

This course explores information security Architecture and Design. The course includes important topics related to use cases and purpose for frameworks, best practices, securing configuration, implementing secure network architectures, implementing secure systems designs, secure staging deployment, security implications of embedded systems; securing application development and deployment; cloud and virtualization concepts. This course also will explore how resiliency and automation strategies reduce risk and the importance of physical security controls. This course directly maps to the objectives and outcomes of the official CompTIA Security+ certification exam, and is also designed based on DHS/NSA’s Center of Academic Excellence criteria and Knowledge Units (KUs) guidelines, as indicated in parentheses after each course learning outcome (CLO). Prerequisites: CIS203

3 Credits

CIS 334Security Access and Identity Management

This course examines information security, identity and Access Management. The course includes important topics related to identity and access management concepts, the installation and configuration of identity and access services; implementing identity and access management controls; and discussions about common account management practices. This course directly maps to the objectives and outcomes of the official CompTIA Security+ certification exam, and is also designed based on DHS/NSA’s Center of Academic Excellence criteria and Knowledge

3 Credits

CIS 440 Security Risk Management, Cryptography, and PKI

This course explains information security Risk Management, Cryptography, and PKI. The course includes important topics related to organizational security risk policies, risk plans and procedures; business impact analysis (BIA), cryptography, algorithms, and their basic characteristics; installation and configuration of wireless security settings and implementation of public key infrastructure. This course directly maps to the objectives and outcomes of the official CompTIA Security+ certification exam, and is also designed based on DHS/NSA’s Center of Academic Excellence criteria and Knowledge Units (KUs) guidelines, as indicated in parentheses after each course learning outcome (CLO). Prerequisites: CIS200

3 Credits

Concentration in Computer Networks

CNT 310 Advanced Networking

This course provides students with knowledge and skills to design, develop, and deploy cloud-based solutions; implement core services; maintain network architectures; and leverage tools to automate networking tasks. In addition, students configure, verify, and troubleshoot IPv4/IPv6 addressing and subnetting schemes to satisfy addressing requirements in a LAN/WAN environments. Prerequisites: CNT100

3 Credits

CNT 311 Local Area Network (LAN) Switching Technologies

This is the first of two courses preparing students for the Interconnecting Cisco Network Devices (ICND1) exam. This exam tests a candidate’s knowledge and skills related to network fundamentals, LAN switching technologies, routing technologies, infrastructure services, and infrastructure maintenance. Cisco offers two options for obtaining Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) certification: Pass the 200-125 CCNA exam, which covers both ICND1 and ICND2 or pass both the 100-105 ICND1 AND the 200-105 ICND2 exams. Prerequisites: CNT100

3 Credits

CNT 312 Routing Technologies

This is the second of two courses preparing students for the Interconnecting Cisco Network Devices (ICND2) exam. This exam tests a candidate’s knowledge and skills related to LAN switching technologies, IPv4 and IPv6 routing technologies, WAN technologies, infrastructure services, and infrastructure maintenance. Cisco offers two options for obtaining Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) certification: Pass the 200-125 CCNA exam, which covers both ICND1 and ICND2 or pass both the 100-105 ICND1 AND the 200-105 ICND2 exams. Prerequisites: CNT311

3 Credits

CNT 313 Wide Area Network (WAN) Technologies

The focus of this course is the study of WAN topology and WAN access connectivity options.  The students learn to configure, verify, and troubleshoot PPP and MLPPP on WAN interfaces using local authentication, PPPoE client-side interfaces using local authentication, GRE tunnel connectivity, single-homed branch connectivity using eBGP IPv4 and basic QoS concepts. Prerequisites: CNT100

3 Credits

CNT 314 Network Security

The CCNA Security Implementing Cisco Network Security (IINS) 210-260 exam is required for the CCNA Security certification. The prerequisite for CCNA Security is the CCNA Route/Switch certification (or any CCIE certification). The CCNA Security exam tests your knowledge of securing Cisco routers and switches and their associated networks. This course prepares you for that exam. Prerequisites: CNT311 and CNT312

3 Credits

Concentration in General Management

BIS 440 Data Analysis and Decision-Making for Managers

This course examines how managers use large amounts of data to solve business problems. Students will be introduced to basic statistics and data analysis, and learn how to use data to make forecasts and support business decisions. As part of the course requirements, students will practice gathering, organizing, analyzing, data, and presenting their findings.

3 Credits

MGT 441 Negotiation and Conflict in Management

Conflict is inherent in all organizations and is often driven by the competition for limited resources and power. This course is an introduction to the sources and types of internal and external conflicts, and the strategies for understanding and managing these conflicts.

3 Credits

MGT 442 Leading Diverse and Dispersed Teams

We have become a global economy, and as a result are operating across different time zones and cultures. Future leaders will need to have skills to create and lead both diverse and dispersed workforces. In this course, students will learn about the challenges of managing in a global economy by reading case studies demonstrating how some organizations have successfully addressed these new leadership challenges.

3 Credits

MGT 443 Supply Chain Management

In this course, students study the following supply chain functions:  logistics, operations, purchasing/sourcing, transportation, inventory, and warehouse management. The use of analytical tools to guide decision-making is emphasized.

3 Credits

MGT 444 Strategic Management

This course is an examination of strategic management concepts.  Students will study the strategic planning process, which includes creating goals, making decisions, taking actions, and analyzing results. The benefits of strategic planning will be identified and distinguished from operational planning. Through discussions, exercises and assignments, students will practice using analytical tools to critically assess an organization’s internal and external environments, competitive opportunities, and threats. Students will be expected to recommend an appropriate organizational strategy, while at the same time critically analyzing other strategic approaches.

3 Credits

Concentration in Robotics and Artificial Intelligence

CCS 400 Advanced Programming Languages

This course covers functional and logic programming, concepts of programming language design, and formal reasoning about programs and programming languages. The key topics include: ML/OCaml, operational, axiomatic and denotational semantics, fixpoints and logic programming. Prerequisites: MAT245 and CCS101

3 Credits

CCS 410 Robotics and Intelligent Systems

This course emphasize mobile internet application basic and features; Android application basics; UI design; data storage; networking application design; advanced application design (sensors, camera, GPS, Audio etc.); graphics and games; web-based hybrid application design. Prerequisites: MAT245, CCS400, and MAT252

3 Credits

CCS 440 Advanced Human-Computer Interaction

This course introduces the field of human-computer interaction (HCI). Students will examine human performance, components of technology, methods and techniques used in design and evaluation of IT as well as the societal impacts of HCI such as accessibility. The course also provides an introduction and evaluation of user-centered design methods, including the contemporary technologies used in empirical evaluation methods. Prerequisites: MAT245 and CIS340

3 Credits

CGS 315 Graphics and Visualization

This course is an introduction to data visualization, non-photorealistic renderings, and perception in virtual environments. It draws from and contributes to work in algorithms, human perception, art, animation, computer vision, and image processing. Key concepts include information visualization, visualization of 2-D and 3-D flow data, multivariate visualization, non-photorealistic rendering, volume visualization, point based modeling and rendering, physically and perceptually-based image synthesis, color appearance design and reproduction, and the investigation of perceptual issues in virtual environments.

3 Credits

MAT 255 Calculus for Engineers

Introduction to applications and techniques of Calculus. Key topics include: limits and continuity, derivatives, chain rules and their applications, analyzing functions, integrals, differential equations and applications of integrals. Prerequisites: MAT252

3 Credits

Concentration in Systems Administration

CSA 310 Systems Administration and Operations

This course is designed to prepare students to pass the AWS certification for exam SOA-C01.  Students will be able to: deploy, manage, and operate scalable, highly available, and fault-tolerant systems on AWS; implement and control the flow of data to and from AWS; select the appropriate AWS service based on compute, data, or security requirements; identify appropriate use of AWS operational best practices; estimate AWS usage costs; identify operational cost control mechanisms and migrate on-premises workloads to AWS. Prerequisites: CIS205

3 Credits

CSA 311 Infrastructure and Deployment

This course is designed to prepare students to pass the MS Azure certification for exam AZ-100. Key topics include: manage Azure subscriptions and resources; implement and manage storage; deploy and manage virtual machines; configure and manage virtual networks; and manage identities. Prerequisites: CIS205

3 Credits

CSA 312 Integration and Security

This course is designed to prepare students to pass the MS Azure certification for exam AZ-101. Key topics include: evaluate and perform server migration to Azure; implement and manage application services; implement advanced virtual networking; and secure identities. Prerequisites: CIS205

3 Credits

CSA 313 Server Migration and Services Implementation

This course is designed to prepare students to pass the MS Azure certification for exam AZ-102. Key topics covered include: evaluate and perform server migration to Azure; implement and manage application services; implement advanced virtual networking; and secure identities. Prerequisites: CSA205

3 Credits

CSA 314 Cloud Platform Management

This course is designed to prepare students to pass the Google certification for Associate Cloud Engineer exam. The student learns how to deploy applications, monitor operations, and manages enterprise solutions. Also, they will be able to use Google Cloud Console and the command-line interface to perform common platform-based tasks to maintain one or more deployed solutions that leverage Google-managed or self-managed services on Google Cloud. Prerequisites: CIS205

3 Credits

Concentration in Software Development

CCS 312 Data Structures, Algorithms and Interactive scripting

In this course students will learn to write programs that use data structures; analyze the performance of different implementations of data structures; and decide on appropriate data structures for modeling a given problem. Also, students will be able to create and describe why and how algorithms solve computational problems; explain how programs implement algorithms in terms of instruction processing, program execution, and running processes; apply appropriate mathematical concepts in programing and formal reasoning on algorithm’s efficiency and correctness and evaluate empirically the efficiency of an algorithm. Prerequisites: MAT255 CCS280

3 Credits

CCS 313 Database, Website, Network Design and Processes

In this course students create web and mobile apps with effective interfaces that respond to events generated by rich user interactions, sensors, and other capabilities of the computing device. Students will also be able to collaborate in the creation of interesting and relevant apps; build and debug app programs using standard libraries, unit testing tools, and debuggers; evaluate readability and clarity of app programs based on program style, documentation, pre- and post-conditions, and procedural abstractions. Prerequisites: MAT245 and CIS110

3 Credits

CCS 400 Advanced Programming Languages

This course covers functional and logic programming, concepts of programming language design, and formal reasoning about programs and programming languages. The key topics include: ML/OCaml, operational, axiomatic and denotational semantics, fixpoints and logic programming. Prerequisites: MAT245 and CCS101

3 Credits

CCS 401 Advanced Programming and Application Development

This course introduce the student to the concepts of object oriented programming. Programming topics include data hiding/encapsulation and abstraction using classes and objects, inheritance, polymorphism, generic programming using template, operator overloading and file I/O. Prerequisites: CCS101 and MAT245

3 Credits

MAT 255 Calculus for Engineers

Introduction to applications and techniques of Calculus. Key topics include: limits and continuity, derivatives, chain rules and their applications, analyzing functions, integrals, differential equations and applications of integrals. Prerequisites: MAT252

3 Credits

Concentration in Web Design

CCS 401 Advanced Programming and Application Development

This course introduce the student to the concepts of object oriented programming. Programming topics include data hiding/encapsulation and abstraction using classes and objects, inheritance, polymorphism, generic programming using template, operator overloading and file I/O. Prerequisites: CCS101 and MAT245

3 Credits

CGS 310 User Experience, Interface and Graphic Design

In this course students learn to apply principles of User Experience Design (UXD) to enhance the user experience of a web site or mobile application; express constraints that mobile platforms put on developers, including the performance vs. power tradeoff; contrast mobile programming, web programming, and general-purpose programming; evaluate the design and architecture of a web or mobile system, including issues such as design patterns (including MVC), layers, tradeoffs between redundancy and scalability, state management, and search engine optimization. Prerequisites: CCS101

3 Credits

CGS 311 Web Animation

In this course students learn to build a simple web site that uses valid HTML and CSS, and apply appropriate web standards from standards bodies such as W3C. They will also be able to develop a web or mobile application that uses industry-standard technologies, integrates serialized data in a structured format such as XML or JSON both synchronously and asynchronously, validates data inputs on the client- and server-side as appropriate, uses cookies, and reads or modifies data in a server-side database. Prerequisites: CIS110

3 Credits

CGS 312 Digital Publishing

This course focuses on characteristics such as color depth, compression, codec, and server requirements for graphic media file formats and streaming media formats. Students will learn to propose a graphic file type for a given set of image characteristics and provide metaphors for issues involved in deploying and serving media content.

3 Credits

CIS 305 Web Full Stack Development

In this course students learn to use industry-standard tools and technologies for web and mobile development; use a development framework such as jQuery, Angular, Laravel, ASP.NET MVC, Django, or WordPress; and use collaboration tools such as GitHub to work with a team on a web or mobile application. Prerequisites: CGS310 and CGS311

3 Credits