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Education

Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies

Delivery Mode: Online (Online Hybrid, California Credential Track)

The Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies degree provides students with the basic understanding and skills to prepare them for careers or professions requiring knowledge based on the arts and humanities. The curriculum of Liberal Studies involves more than one discipline, fostering the understanding of people, nations, institutions, history, arts, sciences, and how these influenced the development of society and cultures. The Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies has 2 tracks: 1. Multiple Subject Credential Preparation track for students in California interested in teaching at the TK-6 level. Students will be required to complete 600 hours of in person, full time student teaching over the course of 16 weeks to fulfill the credential requirements for the state of California. 2. General track for students interested in exploring a variety of topics, transfer students, or students outside of California.

The College of Education offers the following Teacher Credentialing track approved by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC):

  • 2042 Multiple Subject Preliminary Credential
Admission Requirements

Admission requirements can be found here.

Completion Time

10 Semesters / 40 Months*

*Dependent on course load (i.e., Full-Time, Part-Time)

Tuition & Cost

Click here for tuition and fees.

Program Requirements

REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL CREDENTIAL PROGRAM CANDIDATES
All credential candidates must provide evidence of passing the CBEST (California Basic Educational Skills Test) before or during the term in which they reach junior status and provide Certificate of Clearance (fingerprint clearance).

To stay on schedule for graduation and to be recommended as a candidate to the CTC students seeking a credential pathway must show proof of attempting or passing the California Subjects Examination Test (CSET) prior to beginning any EDU coursework. It is highly recommended that candidates take this exam as early in the program as possible.

Student Teaching Requirements

  • Completed and passed the CSET for the credential being sought.
  • CPR Certification
  • Required observation hours completed
  • Complete 600 hours of full-time student teaching in an approved classroom(s) over 2 eight-week sessions regardless of holidays or vacation days
  • Students are advised not to work during their student teaching experience as it is a full-time commitment requiring 40 plus hours each week
  • Substitute teaching and non-sequential or unapproved placements may not be counted towards the 600 hours of required practicum
  • Students may be required to travel to distant school sites as assigned- specific school schedule requests or school sites may or may not be accommodated
  • In order to progress to the second student teaching session (EDU563) a minimum of 1 CalTPA task must be completed

All student teaching must be completed in a California classroom.

Program Completion Requirements

  • Complete program with a Cumulative GPA of 2.50 or higher
  • Passed CalTPA Tasks*
  • Passed the Reading Instruction Competence Assessment (RICA)
  • Complete a Professional Teaching Portfolio
  • Exit Interview
  • Exit Survey

* Preliminary Teacher Credential Candidates are required to successfully complete two (2) CalTPA Instructional Cycles as part of their summative assessment for teacher credentialing as defined in Standard 17 of the 2042 credential document.


Teacher Credentialing and Licensure

Per the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC) all students must meet the specific requirements in effect at the time of candidate application for credential. While the United States University program prepares California teacher candidates it does not guarantee teacher licensure. All credential candidates are encouraged to check the commission requirement page on a regular basis as requirements may change. https://www.ctc.ca.gov/docs/default-source/leaflets/cl560c.pdf?sfvrsn=8db75dfc_16

In order to be recommended to the California Teaching Commission for a Multiple Subject credential candidates must complete the following requirements:

  • Complete a baccalaureate or higher degree from a regionally-accredited college or university
  • Satisfy the basic skills requirement (Passage of the CBEST exam)
  • Achieve a passing score on required subject matter exams (CSET).
  • Pass the Reading Instruction Competence Assessment (RICA).
  • Complete a course in the provisions and principles of the US Constitution.
  • Complete a Commission-approved multiple subject teacher preparation program
  • Obtain a formal recommendation for the credential by the program sponsor.

The following course listings do not include general education requirements for the Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies degree. Please refer to the University Catalog for more information on general education requirements.

Core Courses

EDU205: Health, Nutrition and PE for Teachers

This course will cover the California Common Core standards for physical education.  Students will be introduced to developmentally appropriate activities to help support and scaffold the development of physical skills for young children. Health education and nutrition, including the negative impacts of drugs and drug and alcohol use by children and anti-drug curriculum will be covered.

3 Credit Hours

EDU501: Affirming and Valuing Diversity in the Classroom

The wide variety of students that any teacher will meet in their classrooms, schools and communities will be reviewed with a focus on social justice, equity and educational opportunity for all students. Students will examine research-based cross-cultural strategies necessary to ensure an inclusive classroom honoring individual differences.

3 Credit Hours

EDU503: Foundations of Education

This course provides students with an overview of the historical, cultural, philosophical, legal and political history of the American educational system. Learning theories as applied to classroom teaching and differentiation of instruction will be explored.  The importance of equity and social justice in education will be covered.

3 Credit Hours

EDU504: Introduction to Special Education

This course provides students with an overview of the history and legal requirements of Special Education in the American school system. Students will learn about response to intervention, qualification criteria for special education as well as the requirements of a teacher to support IEP goals and 504 accommodation plans to support students.  Various models of support for students will be reviewed including inclusion, collaboration and co-teaching.

3 Credit Hours

EDU510: Introduction to Classroom Instruction

Students will be provided with research-based instructional strategies, as well as proven classroom routines and procedures that promote student mastery of curriculum by maximizing instructional time. Strategies for providing differentiated instruction as well as the integration of technology for learning will be covered.  Assessment strategies will also be included.

3 Credit Hours

EDU525: English Language Developmental Strategies for English Language Learners

Instructional models, strategies, approaches, assessment and placement of students in English as a second language and content based second language teaching will be explored. Instructional planning for the development of aural and oral language proficiency will be utilized. Research based strategies for teaching language will be applied.

3 Credit Hours

ENG403: Multi-Ethnic Children’s Literature

Focus on various genres for young people. Includes picture books, classics, personified machine heroes, realistic books, etc. Includes enrichment ideas which teachers can use with young children.

Prerequisite: ENG130 English Composition and Reading

3 Credit Hours

HIS320: California History

The political, economic, social, and intellectual growth of California from Spanish colonial era to the present, with emphasis on the themes and movements identified in the California State Framework.

Prerequisites: ENG130 English Composition and Reading

3 Credit Hours

MAT221: Math for Elementary Teachers I

The structure of mathematics taught in the K-8 school curricula. Includes problem solving, whole numbers and integers, algorithms, number theory and fundamentals of algebra.

Prerequisites: MAT105 College Algebra

3 Credit Hours

MAT222: Math for Elementary Teachers II

The structure of mathematics taught in the elementary school curricula. Includes ratio proportion, data collection, distribution, shapes and measurement in geometry.

Prerequisite: MAT221 Math for Elementary Teachers I

3 Credit Hours

MAT223: Algebra and Geometry for Teachers

Students will learn important and specific techniques and strategies aligned with the California Math standards to teach algebra and geometry to children.

Prerequisite: MAT221 Math for Elementary Teachers I, MAT222 Math for Elementary Teachers II

3 Credit Hours

PSY285: Child Development

Development from conception to pre-adolescence. Includes biological, psychological, cognitive-structural, stimulus response, humanistic views. Parental care, attachment-separation, parenting, and institutional care.

3 Credit Hours

SCI222: Science for Elementary Teachers

This course is specifically designed for teachers to be introduced to the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) as well as the California Common Core standards.  Content domains to be covered include; properties of matter, principals of motion and energy, ecology, astronomy, geology, and oceanography.

3 Credit Hours

MULTIPLE SUBJECT PRELIMINARY CREDENTIAL REQUIREMENTS

EDU534: Curriculum and Instruction I

Teacher Candidates will learn how to use and develop curriculum embedded in the California State Standards and Frameworks. Students will learn a variety of instructional methods and strategies to provide differentiated instruction to meet the needs of all learners.

3 Credit Hours

EDU535: Curriculum and Instruction II

This course is a continuation of EDU534.  Teacher candidates will learn how to use and develop curriculum embedded in California State Standards and Framework.  Students will apply a variety of instructional methods and strategies to provide differentiated instruction to meet the needs of all learners.

Prerequisite: EDU534 Curriculum and Instruction I

3 Credit Hours

EDU536: Language Arts and Reading K-6

Approaches, methods, and techniques for teaching literacy skills will be explored. The assessment of literacy skills will be addressed in this course. The six components of literacy instruction (phonemic awareness, phonics, vocabulary, fluency, comprehension and writing) will be addressed throughout the course.  This course meets the requirements of the California Education Code and will offer students support in preparation for the Reading Instruction Competency exam (RICA) required of all California Credential Candidates.

3 Credit Hours

EDU561: Student Teaching (Clinical Practice) I

This full-time supervised clinical practice course requires 300 hours of in class student teaching at the school and grade level assigned.  This course will guide candidates through their daily classroom instructional practice as a student teacher in a public elementary school. The sequence of clinical practice experiences includes multiple opportunities for interaction with diverse populations and communities such as English Language Learners and Special Needs students. All students are provided with experiences which are age and grade appropriate and are required and authorized by the credential they are seeking. Clinical practice is a critical component of the Teacher Preparation Program which combines theory to practice and is rooted in the Unites States University Mission and informed by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing requirements.  The clinical practice experiences provide candidates an opportunity to complete the California Teaching Performance Assessment (CalTPA). The CalTPA is structured around two, full instructional cycles based on the pedagogical sequence of “plan, teach and assess, reflect, and apply, each within a school placement.”

Co-requisites: EDU562 Directed Student Teaching Seminar I

5 Credit Hours

EDU562: Directed Student Teaching Seminar I

This course is designed to provide students with academic and professional support during their student teaching assignment. The courses are offered in a seminar format consisting of reflective discussions that evolve around events in content classes, field experiences, supervised teaching, and collaboration between the candidates, university personnel, and the on-site support provider. The course will also provide candidates assistance and support in the completion of the California Teaching Performance Assessment (CalTPA) instructional cycles, to include implementation, guidance, and remediation. Synchronous (live) meetings via technology will be a requirement of this course.  

Co-requisite: EDU561 or EDU565 Student Teaching (Clinical Practice) I

1 Credit Hour

EDU563: Student Teaching (Clinical Practice) II

This full-time supervised clinical practice course requires 300 hours of in class student teaching at the school and grade level assigned.  This course will guide candidates through their daily classroom instructional practice as a student teacher in a public elementary school. The sequence of clinical practice experiences includes multiple opportunities for interaction with diverse populations and communities such as English Language Learners and Special Needs students. All students are provided with experiences which are age and grade appropriate and are required and authorized by the credential they are seeking. Clinical practice is a critical component of the Teacher Preparation Program which combines theory to practice and is rooted in the Unites States University Mission and informed by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing requirements. The clinical practice experiences provide candidates an opportunity to complete the California Teaching Performance Assessment (CalTPA). The CalTPA is structured around two, full instructional cycles based on the pedagogical sequence of “plan, teach and assess, reflect, and apply, each within a school placement.”

Prerequisite: EDU561 Student Teaching (Clinical Practice) I; Co-requisite: EDU564 Directed Student Teaching Seminar II

5 Credit Hours

EDU564: Directed Student Teaching Seminar II

This course is designed to provide students with academic and professional support during their student teaching assignment.  The course is offered in a seminar format consisting of reflective discussions that evolve around events in the classroom, field experiences, supervised teaching and collaboration between the candidates, university personnel. Support for candidates in the completion of the California Teaching Performance Assessment (CalTPA) instructional cycles, to include implementation, guidance, and remediation will also be included.  Synchronous (live) meetings via technology will be a requirement of this course.  

Prerequisite: EDU562 Directed Student Teaching Seminar I; Co-requisite: EDU563 Student Teaching (Clinical Practice) II

1 Credit Hour

Elective Requirements

Students are required to take 15 credits of electives selected from the list below.

AST101: Astronomy

The nature of the universe. Includes solar system, stars, galaxies, and remote universe.

3 Credit Hours

AST101L: Astronomy Lab

Demonstration of astronomical principles though observation simulation, and analysis of data. Topics may include
the sky, the solar system, stars, nebulae, galaxies, and cosmology.

Co-requisite: AST101 Astronomy

1 Credit Hour

BIO150L: General Biology Lab

Laboratory activities for BIO150 General Biology.

BUS101: Introduction to Business

This course provides an overview of how globalization, society, economic systems, legal and political, financial
institutions, and other forces interact to affect a business organization. An introduction to functional areas within a
business are covered: e.g., business ethics, entrepreneurship, global business, management, marketing,
production, information systems, accounting and finance. Students will effectively be able to create a business
plan using all elements covered within the course.

3 Credit Hours

BUS110: Data Analysis and Communication Tools

This course is a basic introduction to data analysis and communication tools. It is intended to expand students’
skills and competencies in using software tools for analyzing data, converting data into information, and creating
and delivering presentations to support decision-making.

3 Credit Hours

BUS220: Introduction to Business Law

This course provides an overview of the U.S. legal system structure, and basic terms and concepts of Business
Law. Topics may include legal issues associated with ethical conduct in business, consumer protection,
employment law, and social responsibility of corporations. Information literacy skills are honed as students learn to
retrieve, read, and analyze business law cases.

3 Credit Hours

BUS331: Business Ethics

This course provides students with the tools necessary to examine moral problems and make effective decisions on
ethical issues faced in the workplace. Topics considered include discrimination, affirmative action, sexual
harassment, informational privacy, drug testing, ethics in advertising, business and the environment, and global
ethics. Emphasis will be placed on the study of the ethical values, principles, and theories pertinent to management. Students will also examine social responsibilities of managers in the workplace.

3 Credit Hours

CHM102: Principles of Chemistry

This course covers the applications of chemistry for science majors. Topics included are the composition of matter,
atomic structure, periodic relations and nomenclature. Includes qualitative and quantitative experiments.

3 Credit Hours

CHM102L: Principles of Chemistry Lab

Laboratory activities for CHM102 Principles of Chemistry.

1 Credit Hour

CIS101 IT Fundamentals

This course provides foundational skills for subsequent IT courses. It provides an overview of the discipline of IT, describes how it relates to other computing disciplines, and begins to instill an IT mindset. The goal is to help students understand the diverse contexts in which IT is used and the challenges inherent in the diffusion of innovative technology.

3 Credit Hours

CNT100: Fundamentals of Networking

Practical course intended for those interested in learning computer networking with an emphasis on earning the Computing Technology Industry Association’s certification Network+, a foundation-level, vendor-neutral international industry credential that validates the knowledge of networking professionals.

3 Credit Hours

FIN310: Introduction to Finance

The purpose of this course is to introduce basic financial principles preparing students to interpret a company’s
financial statements. Topics include analyzing the deployment of company funds, employee staffing, revenues, expenses, and cash flow. Emphasis is on understanding and gauging the financial health of an organization to assist in managerial decision-making and strategic planning to ensure its success.

3 Credit Hours

HCA101: Healthcare Delivery in the United States

Introduction to the healthcare delivery system in the United States; overview of U.S. healthcare delivery, healthcare providers and professionals, technology and its effects, financing, outpatient services and primary care, healthcare delivery institutions, the role of federal government, methods of reimbursement and managed care, implications for the healthcare provider, professional practice, and for individuals, families and communities included. Emphasis is on access, cost, affordability and quality of care and the future of health services delivery.

3 Credit Hours

HCA201: Terminologies and Classification Systems

Health informatics, to promote meaningful and reliable analysis and sharing of data, utilizes a common set of
abstractions, terminologies, and coding systems. Students will gain an understanding of these terminologies and their use within various institutional settings. Special attention and focus will be given to the selection of terminologies based on various institutional or business needs.

3 Credit Hours

HED300: Introduction to Health Education

This introductory course provides the foundation to the concepts of health education and the typical responsibilities of health educators, including assessing the needs of individuals and communities; planning effective health education programs; implementing health education programs and evaluating their effectiveness; administering services; acting as a resource person; and communicating and advocating for health and health education.

3 Credit Hours

HRM210: Introduction to Human Resources Management

An introductory course to key competencies essential to Human Resource operations. Examination on the various
roles of Human Resources (recruitment, legal issues, selection, assessment and development, compensation, benefits) and a broad review of issues faced within an organization (termination, harassment, workplace violence).

3 Credit Hours

HSC101: Health and Society

Analysis of major health problems affecting the life of the individual, the family and community at large. Evaluation, planning and implementation of approaches to meeting personal and societal health needs.

3 Credit Hours

HSC105: Cultural Competence in Healthcare

This course is designed to enable healthcare professionals to deliver sensitive, humanistic and respectful care to clients and their families living in a global community. Emphasized is the valuing of differences to work effectively in cross-cultural situations. Explored are the changing demographics, awareness and acknowledgement of various cultural beliefs which are vital to delivering quality healthcare.

3 Credit Hours

HSC215: Survey of Public Health Biology

Because healthcare organizations are encouraged to apply proven evidence-based techniques to manage the health
of populations and their individual members, knowledge of relevant biomedical concepts are important to administrators, managers and analysts. This course presents the foundation concepts of pathophysiology, infectious disease and chronic conditions in the context of public health as a discipline for improving outcomes.

3 Credit Hours

MGT321: Organizational Behavior and Management

The purpose of this course is to develop student skills in applying theories and concepts of organizational behavior
to enable the student to identify and resolve behavioral issues within global organizations. Topics include factors affecting individual and group motivation in the workplace,  development of effective groups and teams, organizational cultures, ethical issues in organizational behavior, as well as organizational behavior issues in global organizations.

3 Credit Hours

MGT332: Introduction to Project Management

This course introduces students to best practices in project management. Topics include definitions of project management and the environment. Students will also write proposals that cover the essential elements: project scope, work breakdown structure (WBS), the project schedule, project budget, and risk management, and project budgets. Group collaboration is emphasized to assist in understanding the effects of team/group dynamics in project management.

3 Credit Hours

MGT334: Organizational and Business Communication

This course provides an introduction to the mechanics and politics of organizational and business communication.
Contemporary theories and the evolving rules of business and how we communicate in the era of social media are explored. Preparing and delivering reports, messages, and presentations is reviewed with learners having an opportunity to develop documents and messages. Students will practice applying modern organizational communication strategies to internal and external business communication challenges from the lens of leadership with key constituents in mind.

3 Credit Hours

MGT410: Leading Organizations

New technology and the pace of change are challenging organizations to adapt and operate very differently than
they did just a decade ago. This course focuses on the skills leaders need to lead successful organizations in the future. Students will explore fundamentals and current trends in leadership, communication, change, innovation, diversity, organizational culture and team development.

3 Credit Hours

MGT441 Negotiation and Conflict Management

Conflict is inherent in all organizations and is often driven by the competition for limited resources and power. This course is an introduction to the sources and types of internal and external conflicts, and the strategies for understanding and managing these conflicts.

3 Credit Hours

MGT442 Leading Diverse and Dispersed Teams

We have become a global economy, and as a result are operating across different time zones and cultures. Future
leaders will need to have skills to create and lead both diverse and dispersed workforces. In this course, students will learn about the challenges of managing in a global economy by reading case studies demonstrating how some organizations have successfully addressed these new leadership challenges.

3 Credit Hours

MKT210: Principles of Marketing

This course provides a familiarization with the field of marketing with an emphasis on the elements of marketing
and associated strategies (analyses of customer, company, and competitor).

3 Credit Hours

PHI105: Introduction to Philosophy and Ethics

Synthesizes philosophical and ethical topics from the Western tradition including: theory of knowledge, metaphysics and reality, ethical relativism, deontology, God, skepticism, justice, free will, and moral responsibility, with inclusion of selected philosophers from Classic Era to the twentieth century.

3 Credit Hours

General Non-Teaching Track

Students may elect to complete a Bachelor of Arts Liberal Studies degree if they are not interested in teaching at the TK-6 level or do not reside in California. Liberal Studies is a multidisciplinary major that provides flexibility for students to select a wide range of elective courses that meet their areas of interest as well as provide exposure to many disciplines. Students who plan to attend graduate school as well as those that are interested in a career in a wide range of sectors may benefit from a liberal studies degree. Skills developed throughout the program include those most valued by employer; problem solving and teamwork, oral and written communication skills, information literacy and creativity, quantitative reasoning and an understanding of cultures and societies.

Core Requirements

COM204: Argumentation

Basic principles and skills involved in understanding, analyzing, evaluating, and constructing arguments. Writing
intensive.

Prerequisite: ENG130 English Composition and Reading

3 Credit Hours

ENG306: Survey of American Literature

Study of selected works from authors from the present time.

Prerequisite: ENG130 English Composition and Reading

3 Credit Hours

ENG307: Survey of World Classics

Study of classical works from different cultures to include Greek and Roman classics as well as European.

Prerequisite: ENG130 English Composition and Reading

3 Credit Hours

ENG310: Advanced Composition

Designed for research in a variety of academic disciplines. Enables students to translate research activities into written reports that conform to the expectations of scientific and academic writing.

Prerequisite: ENG130 English Composition and Reading

3 Credit Hours

HED201: Human Nutrition

The purpose of the course is to introduce the student to key concepts of human nutrition. Emphasis is placed on macro and micronutrients as methods of assessing nutrient intake in the well client. Additional topics include digestive processes, food additives, safety and sanitation as well as factors that influence nutrient intake. Fundamentals of normal nutrition, carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins, minerals and their roles in human metabolism as well as nutrition and the life cycle are presented and explored.

3 Credit Hours

HIS321: World History I

Themes in the institutional, political, socio-economic, and cultural development of ancient societies. The growth of civilizations and the interrelationships of peoples of Europe, Asia, Africa, and America.

Prerequisites: ENG130 English Composition and Reading

3 Credit Hours

HIS322: World History II

Themes in the institutional, political, socio-economic, and cultural development of society and socio-political changes. The growth of civilizations and the interrelationships of peoples of Europe, Asia, Africa, and America.

Prerequisites: HIS321 World History I

3 Credit Hours

LIB499: Liberal Studies Capstone*

This is the culminating course for a liberal studies student that is not entering the field of teaching. This is a summative course that requires students to demonstrate their master of the program learning outcomes through the application of knowledge gained throughout the program.

3 Credit Hours

*Non-transferable course and must be taken last session.

LIN478: Linguistics

This course is an in-depth study of the relationship between language and schooling. Focus is placed on the analysis of classroom language use and variations in instructional settings. Emphasis will also be on practical application of socio-linguistics, psycho-linguistics as they apply to English Language Learners.

Prerequisite: ENG140 English Composition and Critical Thinking

3 Credit Hours

POS399: Special Topics in Political Science and International Relations

This is an upper division special topic course in political science and international relations. Topics may vary each
session.

3 Credit Hours

SOC101: Introduction to Sociology

Study of human behavior. Includes sociological perspective, culture, socialization, social organization and stratification, deviant behavior and the family.

3 Credit Hours

SSC499 Senior Seminar: Social Sciences

This is a senior seminar course that will focus in the area of social sciences. Topics may vary each session.

3 Credit Hours

Elective Requirements

Students are required to take 39 credits of electives selected from the list below.

AST101: Astronomy

The nature of the universe. Includes solar system, stars, galaxies, and remote universe.

3 Credit Hours

AST101L: Astronomy Lab

Demonstration of astronomical principles though observation simulation, and analysis of data. Topics may include the sky, the solar system, stars, nebulae, galaxies, and cosmology.

1 Credit Hour

BIO150L: General Biology Lab

Laboratory activities for BIO150 General Biology.

1 Credit Hour

BUS101: Introduction to Business

This course provides an overview of how globalization, society, economic systems, legal and political, financial institutions, and other forces interact to affect a business organization. An introduction to functional areas within a business are covered: e.g., business ethics, entrepreneurship, global business, management, marketing, production, information systems, accounting and finance. Students will effectively be able to create a business plan using all elements covered within the course.

3 Credit Hours

BUS110: Data Analysis and Communication Tools

This course is a basic introduction to data analysis and communication tools. It is intended to expand students’
skills and competencies in using software tools for analyzing data, converting data into information, and creating
and delivering presentations to support decision-making.

3 Credit Hours

BUS220: Introduction to Business Law

This course provides an overview of the U.S. legal system structure, and basic terms and concepts of Business Law. Topics may include legal issues associated with ethical conduct in business, consumer protection, employment law, and social responsibility of corporations. Information literacy skills are honed as students learn to retrieve, read, and analyze business law cases.

3 Credit Hours

BUS331: Business Ethics

This course provides students with the tools necessary to examine moral problems and make effective decisions on
ethical issues faced in the workplace. Topics considered include discrimination, affirmative action, sexual harassment, informational privacy, drug testing, ethics in advertising, business and the environment, and global ethics. Emphasis will be placed on the study of the ethical values, principles, and theories pertinent to management. Students will also examine social responsibilities of managers in the workplace.

3 Credit Hours

CHM102: Principles of Chemistry

This course covers the applications of chemistry for science majors. Topics included are the composition of matter,
atomic structure, periodic relations and nomenclature. Includes qualitative and quantitative experiments.

3 Credit Hours

CHM102L: Principles of Chemistry Lab

Laboratory activities for CHM102 Principles of Chemistry.

1 Credit Hour

CIS101: IT Fundamentals

This course provides foundational skills for subsequent IT courses. It provides an overview of the discipline of IT,
describes how it relates to other computing disciplines, and begins to instill an IT mindset. The goal is to help students understand the diverse contexts in which IT is used and the challenges inherent in the diffusion of innovative technology.

3 Credit Hours

CNT100: Fundamentals of Networking

Practical course intended for those interested in learning computer networking with an emphasis on earning the
Computing Technology Industry Association’s certification Network+, a foundation-level, vendor-neutral international industry credential that validates the knowledge of networking professionals.

3 Credit Hours

FIN310: Introduction to Finance

The purpose of this course is to introduce basic financial principles preparing students to interpret a company’s
financial statements. Topics include analyzing the deployment of company funds, employee staffing, revenues, expenses, and cash flow. Emphasis is on understanding and gauging the financial health of an organization to assist in managerial decision-making and strategic planning to ensure its success.

3 Credit Hours

HCA101: Healthcare Delivery in the United States

Introduction to the healthcare delivery system in the United States; overview of U.S. healthcare delivery, healthcare providers and professionals, technology and its effects, financing, outpatient services and primary care, healthcare delivery institutions, the role of federal government, methods of reimbursement and managed care, implications for the healthcare provider, professional practice, and for individuals, families and communities included. Emphasis is on access, cost, affordability and quality of care and the future of health services delivery.

3 Credit Hours

HCA201: Terminologies and Classification Systems

Health informatics, to promote meaningful and reliable analysis and sharing of data, utilizes a common set of abstractions, terminologies, and coding systems. Students will gain an understanding of these terminologies and their use within various institutional settings. Special attention and focus will be given to the selection of terminologies based on various institutional or business needs.

3 Credit Hours

HED300: Introduction to Health Education

This introductory course provides the foundation to the concepts of health education and the typical responsibilities of health educators, including assessing the needs of individuals and communities; planning effective health education programs; implementing health education programs and evaluating their effectiveness; administering services; acting as a resource person; and communicating and advocating for health and health education.

3 Credit Hours

HIS320 California History

The political, economic, social, and intellectual growth of California from Spanish colonial era to the present, with emphasis on the themes and movements identified in the California State Framework.

Prerequisites: ENG130 English Composition and Reading

3 Credit Hours

HRM210: Introduction to Human Resource Management

An introductory course to key competencies essential to Human Resource operations. Examination on the various
roles of Human Resources (recruitment, legal issues, selection, assessment and development, compensation, benefits) and a broad review of issues faced within an organization (termination, harassment, workplace violence).

3 Credit Hours

HSC101: Health and Safety

Analysis of major health problems affecting the life of the individual, the family and community at large. Evaluation, planning and implementation of approaches to meeting personal and societal health needs.

3 Credit Hours

HSC105: Cultural Competence in Healthcare

This course is designed to enable healthcare professionals to deliver sensitive, humanistic and respectful care to clients and their families living in a global community. Emphasized is the valuing of differences to work effectively in cross-cultural situations. Explored are the changing demographics, awareness and acknowledgement of various cultural beliefs which are vital to delivering quality healthcare.

3 Credit Hours

HSC215: Survey of Public Health Biology

Because healthcare organizations are encouraged to apply proven evidence-based techniques to manage the health
of populations and their individual members, knowledge of relevant biomedical concepts are important to administrators, managers and analysts. This course presents the foundation concepts of pathophysiology, infectious disease and chronic conditions in the context of public health as a discipline for improving outcomes.

3 Credit Hours

MGT321: Organizational Behavior and Management

The purpose of this course is to develop student skills in applying theories and concepts of organizational behavior
to enable the student to identify and resolve behavioral issues within global organizations. Topics include factors affecting individual and group motivation in the workplace,  development of effective groups and teams, organizational cultures, ethical issues in organizational behavior, as well as organizational behavior issues in global organizations.

3 Credit Hours

MGT332: Introduction to Project Management

This course introduces students to best practices in project management. Topics include definitions of project management and the environment. Students will also write proposals that cover the essential elements: project scope, work breakdown structure (WBS), the project schedule, project budget, and risk management, and project budgets. Group collaboration is emphasized to assist in understanding the effects of team/group dynamics in project management.

3 Credit Hours

MGT334: Organizational and Business Communication

This course provides an introduction to the mechanics and politics of organizational and business communication. Contemporary theories and the evolving rules of business and how we communicate in the era of social media are explored. Preparing and delivering reports, messages, and presentations is reviewed with learners having an opportunity to develop documents and messages. Students will practice applying modern organizational communication strategies to internal and external business communication challenges from the lens of leadership with key constituents in mind.

3 Credit Hours

MGT441: Negotiation and Conflict Management

Conflict is inherent in all organizations and is often driven by the competition for limited resources and power. This course is an introduction to the sources and types of internal and external conflicts, and the strategies for understanding and managing these conflicts.

3 Credit Hours

MGT442: Leading Diverse and Dispersed Teams

We have become a global economy, and as a result are  operating across different time zones and cultures. Future
leaders will need to have skills to create and lead both diverse and dispersed workforces. In this course, students will learn about the challenges of managing in a global economy by reading case studies demonstrating how some organizations have successfully addressed these new leadership challenges.

3 Credit Hours

MKT210: Principles of Marketing

This course provides a familiarization with the field of marketing with an emphasis on the elements of marketing
and associated strategies (analyses of customer, company, and competitor).

3 Credit Hours